Malakoff Diggins State Historic Park

Due to the current state wildfire crisis, the closure of neighboring USFS lands, COVID-19 and its impacts on Parks personnel to support basic operations, the Sierra District will not be allowing walk-ins at any campgrounds for the remainder of the season. Day use areas and trails remain open. The previous district-wide ban on campfires and charcoal bbqs remains in place. The District will continue to monitor conditions and may impose further restrictions and closures as necessary.
Update (March 17, 2021): With the Regional Stay at Home Order lifted, State Parks is reopening campground sites for existing reservation holders. The department will be using a phased approach to reopen other campground sites for new reservations, starting January 28. The public is advised that not all campground sites are open to the public due to the pandemic, wildfire impacts and other issues. Additionally, group campsites remain closed. Day use outdoor areas of park units currently open to the public remain open.

As State Parks increases access to the State Park System, it is critical that Californians continue to recreate responsibly in the outdoors as the pandemic is far from over.

Please take the time to read the information contained on this webpage to find out what is open and closed, and the COVID-19 guidelines for this park unit.

What is open now?
  • Malakoff Diggins is open from sunrise to sunset with COVID-19 guidelines in place.
  • Very limited parking is now available to the public.
  • All trail systems are available and active recreation will be permitted.
  • Outdoor restrooms will be available.
  • Visitor Center during business hours for fee collection, information, restrooms, and gift shop. Limited visitor access to exhibits inside building. Masks are required in public buildings and spaces where physical distancing is not easily maintained.

What is currently closed at this park and throughout the State Park System?
At this park:
  • Campgrounds.
  • All historic buildings.
Statewide:
  • Some park units and campground sites continue to be temporarily closed due to the pandemic, impacts from wildfires or other issues. Please visit the webpage of your local outdoor destination to find out if it is open.
  • High public-use indoor facilities, including museums and visitor centers.
  • Special events and tours continue to be canceled until further notice.

Are there any new visitor guidelines?
State Parks has implemented the following guidelines to reduce the risk of exposure to COVID-19 in the outdoors:
  • Stay Local: Stay close to home during this pandemic period. If you or anyone in your household is feeling sick, please remain at home and plan your trip for another time. 
  • Plan Ahead
    • The ongoing pandemic response continues to be dynamic and fluid. Prior to leaving home, check the webpage of your outdoor destination you plan to visit to find out if it is open, if parking is available, and what visitor guidelines are in effect.
    • Learn what safety precautions you should take when exploring the outdoors at parks.ca.gov/SafetyTips.
    • SNO-PARKS: Make sure your vehicle is snow ready. A permit is required for each vehicle parked at a SNO-PARK site. Parking is on a first come, first-serve basis at all SNO-PARK sites. The public is advised that parking lots are filling up early in the day. Illegal parking is prohibited. More information can be found at ohv.parks.ca.gov/SNOPARKS.
  • Stay Safer at Six Feet: No matter the recreational activity, maintain a physical distance of six feet or more. Your guests should only include those within your immediate household. This means no guests or friends, and no gatherings or parties. If there are too many people to maintain the required physical distance, please visit us on a different day. 
    • Boating: Do not raft up to other boaters or pull up onto a beach next to other recreators.
    • Off-highway Vehicle Recreation: Do not ride next to others or pull up next to someone else as it could put you in close proximity to others. Stage 10 feet or more from each other during unloading and loading.
  • Keep Clean: Be prepared as not all services may be available. Some restrooms will be temporarily closed to keep up with cleaning schedules. Bring soap/hand sanitizer. Please pack out all trash. Park units are experiencing heavy use and you can help alleviate the impact on park facilities.
  • Stay Covered: The state requires you to wear a face covering when you cannot maintain a physical distance of six feet or more. Individuals must have a face covering with them at all times.

Although law enforcement entities have the authority to issue citations, the expectation is that the public is responsible for adhering to the advice of public health officials, visitor guidelines and closures.

California State Parks continues to work with local and state officials on a phased and regionally driven approach to increase access to state park units where compliance with state and local public health ordinances can be achieved. However, the situation remains fluid and park operations can change at any time. For information on statewide current closures and available services, please visit parks.ca.gov/FlattenTheCurve.

Phone Number

(530) 265-2740

Max. Trailer Lengths

Trailer: Up to 18 Feet
Camper/Motorhome: Up to 24 Feet

Park Hours

The park is open daily on a self-guided basis from sunrise until sunset. The Visitor Center will be open 7 days a week. The Museum and all other historic buildings are closed at this time.

Dogs Allowed?

Yes
Except for service animals, dogs not allowed inside historic buildings.

Driving Directions to Malakoff Diggins SHP

Travel 11-miles north on highway-49 toward Downieville. Turn right onto Tyler Foote Road, stay on the pavement and follow the yellow line to the park. The road changes names a few times (Curzon Grade Road, Back Bone Road, Derbec Road, North Bloomfield Road).
These are not high-speed roads. The park is 26-miles from Nevada City.

Camping and Lodging

Visitors will be able to reserve campsites and lodging six months in advance from the current date. Bookings may extend from the arrival date to the desired departure date – based on availability and the park’s maximum stay rules.

Upcoming Park Events

No events scheduled at this moment.

BOATING
Boating
OVERNIGHT FACILITIES
En route Campsites
Family Campsites
Group Campsites
Alternative Camping
RV Access
TRAIL USE
Hiking Trails
Horseback Riding
DAY-USE ACTIVITIES & FACILITIES
Historical/Cultural Site
Picnic Areas
Env. Learning/Visitor Center
Exhibits and Programs
Fishing
Guided Tours
Interpretive Exhibits
Swimming
Vista Point
Museums
Family Programs
Geocaching
OTHER FACILITIES & VISITOR INFORMATION
Parking
Restrooms
Drinking Water Available

Park Information

Malakoff Diggins State Historic Park is nestled amongst the pine-studded chaparral forest of the Sierra Nevada Foothills and is home to California’s largest hydraulic gold mine. The 3,000-acre park encompasses the town of North Bloomfield and the historic Diggins site, which allows visitors to step back in time and experience the boom and bust of the California Gold Rush. Visitors can see huge cliffs carved by mighty jets of water, results of the gold-mining technique of washing away entire mountains to find gold. Legal battles between mine companies and the downstream agricultural towns of Marysville and Yuba City ended this particular method of mining, and was the first environmental lawsuit in the United States. The park Visitor Center features displays on mining and pioneer life in the old mining town of North Bloomfield, as well as a short video on hydraulic mining. The park also offers unparalleled hiking, camping, and fishing opportunities, and, in winter, snowshoeing.  


Trail information

Malakoff Diggins has over 20 miles of trails throughout the park. Trails range in length from 1/2 mile to 3 miles one way, from easy to steep elevation changes.  Call the park to learn about available dog-friendly trails.  Dogs must be on a controlled leash at all times.


Camping Information

The Chute Hill Campground will be available by reservations only from June 12, 2020 through September 30, 2020.  Please log into (www.reservecalifornia.com) to make your reservations.

Important: The Cabins will not be available for the 2020 camping season.


Location-Directions

Do not use your GPS unless you wish to travel on a dirt road for 7 miles.  North Bloomfield Road is not recommended. For an all paved route to the park travel from Nevada City, travel 11-miles north on highway 49 toward Downieville.   Turn right on Tyler Foote Road from Highway 49 and follow the main paved road to the park. The main road changes names a few times from Tyler Foote Road to Cruzon Grade Road to Back Bone Road.  Turn right on Derbec Road then right on North Bloomfield Road. You will stay on paved roads all the way to the park.  These are not high-speed roads. The park is 26-miles (50 min drive time) from Nevada City.


Seasons/Climate/Recommended Clothing

Summer and spring are warm; fall and winter can be cool. Layered clothing is advised.

Filming Videos and Still Photography in State Parks

Image of couple at Torrey Pines SBCalifornia State Parks thanks you for choosing our beautiful parks for your photographic activities and sharing the wonders of our park units with the world. However, in order to maintain the beauty of our parks and its natural and cultural resources, we request that all commercial, still and motion picture photographers obtain a film permit from the California Film Commission.

California State Parks requires an approved film permit for:
  • All commercial still photography and videography
  • Professional photographers offering services
  • Student photo/film
  • Professional development projects

Drones are not permitted unless a special permit is granted. Use film and photography permits link below for further contact information.
To learn more, please visit our blog here.

For specific film permit information at Empire Mine State Historic Park, Malakoff Diggins State Historic Park or South Yuba River State Park, please review Sierra Gold Sector Film Permit information.

Malakoff Diggins SHP(Photograph by Mike Fuller)
Malakoff Diggins State Historic Park
At Malakoff Diggins State Historic Park, the ancient river gravels are important from a geologic perspective in that they provide insight into the timing of the geologic events that gave rise to the current Sierra Nevada. From the human perspective, the gold in the gravels was a source of vast wealth that drove that development of early California.


The full Geo Gems report
  |  Geological Gems of State Parks

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