Leland Stanford Mansion State Historic Park

UPDATE (May 1, 2020): This park is temporarily closed to vehicular access, meaning there are no parking facilities and parking on roadways is prohibited to protect public health from the COVID-19 pandemic. Although this park is open to local residents, they must abide by the following guidelines:

  • Stay Local: Walk or bike into the park. Do not drive to the park.
  • Stay Active: Keep walking, jogging, hiking and biking. Watch for one-way trails.
  • Stay Safer at 6 Feet: Maintain a physical distance of 6 feet or more. Gatherings, picnics and parties are not allowed. Visitors are being asked to leave if there are too many people at the park or on trails to allow for the required physical distance.
  • Stay Clean: Be prepared. Bring soap/sanitizer and pack out all trash.

Statewide, many parks and beaches are temporarily closed or have very limited access to ensure Californians are abiding and practicing physical distancing. The goals are to make sure people are safe and to mitigate the spread of COVID-19 as much as possible. To view the list of closures and what they mean to the public, please visit www.parks.ca.gov/FlattenTheCurve.

Phone Number

(916) 324-0575

Park Hours

Closed

Dogs Allowed?

Yes
Only service animals permitted on grounds and on guided tours of mansion.

Driving Directions to Leland Stanford Mansion SHP

The mansion is located in downtown Sacramento at 8th and N Streets, just a few blocks from the State Capitol.

Online reservations are not available for this park.

Upcoming Park Events

No events scheduled at this moment.

DAY-USE ACTIVITIES & FACILITIES
Historical/Cultural Site
Env. Learning/Visitor Center
Exhibits and Programs
Guided Tours
Interpretive Exhibits
Museums
Family Programs
OTHER FACILITIES & VISITOR INFORMATION
Restrooms
Drinking Water Available

In an effort to protect public health and the safety of our visitors, volunteers and staff as the state responds to the continued threat of COVID-19, California State Parks is temporarily closing the Leland Stanford Mansion State Historic Park. While we are not directly affected by COVID-19, we are monitoring the situation carefully and are committed to following California Governor’s updated policy on social gatherings to help slow the spread of COVID-19. We thank you for your patience, trust and continued support. We’d also like to thank our volunteers, partners, and staff for their commitment and dedication as public servants through these challenging circumstances. For the most up-to-date information, please follow our park webpage. 

Welcome to Leland Stanford Mansion State Historic Park

The Leland Stanford Mansion grounds are seen with the Resources Building behind.After a 14-year, $22 million restoration and rehabilitation, the Mansion is now open to the public as a museum.  It also serves the citizens of California as the state’s official reception center for leaders from around the world.

The Leland Stanford Mansion is a stunning example of the splendor and elegance of the Victorian era in California.  On your tour of the 19,000-square-foot Mansion you will see:

  • 17-foot ceilings
  • Gilded mirrors and exquisitely detailed carved moldings
  • Beautifully restored woodwork
  • Elegant 19th century crystal and bronze light fixtures
  • Historic paintings
  • Re-created carpeting and draperies based on photographs from the 1870s to match the original interior design
  • Original period furnishings that belonged to the Stanfords.
  • 19th-Century style gardens

Leland Stanford Mansion State Historic ParkOriginally built in 1856 by Gold Rush merchant Sheldon Fogus, the Mansion was later purchased and remodeled (twice!) by Leland and Jane Stanford. Leland Stanford served as Governor of California from 1862-1863.  The Mansion served as the office of three governors during the turbulent 1860’s - Leland Stanford, Fredrick Low and Henry Haight. 

As a pro-Union Civil War governor and president of the Central Pacific Railroad, Leland Stanford negotiated political and business deals at the Mansion that helped complete the transcontinental railroad.  

Jane Lathrop Stanford gave birth to their only child, Leland, Jr., here on May 14, 1868. The couple’s new wealth enabled them to expand the mansion in 1872, creating the architectural legacy you can see today.

In 1900 Jane Stanford gave the mansion to the Catholic Diocese of Sacramento, with an endowment of $75,000 in railroad bonds, for the “nurture, care and maintenance of homeless children.” The Sisters of Mercy, and later the Sisters of Social Service, adapted the aging building to their needs. As decades passed, the old neighborhood gave way to state office buildings, and the cost of upkeep grew.  In 1987, the Stanford Home for Children moved to new facilities in north Sacramento.

In 1978 the State of California purchased the property for use as a state park. The imposing structure was listed as a National Historic Landmark in May 1987.

Leland Stanford Mansion State Historic Park

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