For Immediate Release: 11/20/2020

California State Parks Extends Application Deadline for Competitive Statewide Park Program

Contact: Newsroom@parks.ca.gov

$395.3 million available to create new parks and recreational opportunities - applications due March 12, 2021

California State Parks is extending the application deadline for Round 4 of the?Statewide Park Development and Community Revitalization Grant Program?(SPP) from Dec. 14, 2020, to March 12, 2021. For this round, there is $395.3 million in Proposition 68 competitive grant funding available to cities, counties, nonprofit organizations, local districts and joint powers authorities to create new parks and recreational opportunities. Applications must be submitted through an?online application system at parks.ca.gov/spp by the new deadline.  

“Every community deserves to have access to public lands and recreation spaces near their communities,” said California State Parks Director Armando Quintero. “Through the Statewide Park Development and Community Revitalization Grant Program, the state continues to invest in expanding access to the benefits of outdoor spaces to park-deficient, economically disadvantaged communities.”

In 2018, California voters passed the California Drought, Water, Parks, Climate, Coastal Protection, and Outdoor Access for All Act of 2018 (Proposition 68), which directed a total $650.2 million in funding to California State Parks for competitive grants to create new non-state parks and enhance recreational opportunities for all Californians. This is the state’s largest investment in grant funding history targeted for underserved communities.The bond also provides funds for aging infrastructure, amenities and improvements to parks that will help attract new and diverse visitors.

Using a multi-level review process, applications submitted for the SPP Program will be reviewed by a competitive review team from State Park’s Office of Grants and Local Services (OGALS). Grant decisions may be announced by late summer, 2021. 

OGALS recently published a report named Designing Parks Using Community Based Planning as a resource to inspire meaningful community engagement for future public projects. The report shares methods learned through California's SPP, and outlines a three-step public engagement model for designing community parks. To see examples of community-based planning in action, and a SPP project gallery, please visit www.ParksforCalifornia.org.    

Since 1964, more than 7,400 parks throughout California have been created or improved through grant programs administered by OGALS. The mission of OGALS is to address California’s diverse recreational, cultural and historical resource needs by developing grant programs, administering funds, offering technical assistance, building partnerships and providing leadership through quality customer service. For more information on Proposition 68 programs and other grant programs, visit www.parks.ca.gov/grants.

Top photos: Community members planning the future 900 Innes Park in Bayview Hunter's Point, San Francisco. The project will create waterfront park access, connect the SF Bay Trail, and include placemaking public art. Bottom photos: Youth voting to select recreation features for the new Gateway Park site in the city of Corcoran. Please note: All photos were taken in 2019 before COVID-19 guidelines were in place. Photos from California State Parks.
Top photos: Community members planning the future 900 Innes Park in Bayview Hunter's Point, San Francisco. The project will create waterfront park access, connect the SF Bay Trail, and include placemaking public art. Bottom photos: Youth voting to select recreation features for the new Gateway Park site in the city of Corcoran. Please note: All photos were taken in 2019 before COVID-19 guidelines were in place. Photos from California State Parks.






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California State Parks provides for the health, inspiration and education of the people of California by helping to preserve the state’s extraordinary biological diversity, protecting its most valued natural and cultural resources, and creating opportunities for high quality outdoor recreation.