For Immediate Release: 10/27/2020

California State Historical Resources Commission to Consider 14 Properties for Action

Contact: Newsroom

The California State Historical Resources Commission (Commission) invites the public to participate in its next commission meeting being held virtually on Friday, November 6 at 9 a.m. A total of 14 nominations will be considered by the commissioners -- 11 nominations for federal historic designation and three nominations for state historic designation.

Some of the nominations being considered by the Commission include the Chinese Shrimp Camp in Contra Costa County, which is associated with Chinese American labor in the fishing and processing industries circa 1870 until circa 1912. Another property being considered is the Mission Cultural Center in San Francisco, a property significant for its association with the social and ethnic history of the Mission District as a predominately Latino enclave, as well as with the development of Latino arts in San Francisco alongside California’s Latino cultural center movement of the 1970s.

All properties being considered at the meeting include:

National Register of Historic Places Nominations

Chinese Shrimp Camp (Restricted Location, Contra Costa County)

The site, which represents the remains of a shrimp camp occupied by Chinese American fishermen from circa 1870 until circa 1912, is located on the eastern edge of San Francisco Bay. At its peak, the camp contained 30 shacks, five wharves and 10 boats. The buildings and structures have been razed, although two earthen jetties remain. As a property type associated with Chinese American labor in the fishing and processing industries, the Chinese Shrimp Camp meets the registration requirements of the Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders in California, 1850-1970 Multiple Property Submission.

Mission Cultural Center (San Francisco, San Francisco County)

Located in the Mission District, a large and diverse neighborhood in the east-central portion of San Francisco, the reinforced concrete building was constructed in 1947 as a furniture store and converted into the cultural center in 1977. The upper portion of the primary and east façades feature a large mural depicting Latino cultural themes. As a property significant for its association with the social and ethnic history of the Mission District as a predominately Latino enclave, along with the development of Latino arts in San Francisco in association with California’s Latino cultural center movement of the 1970s, the building meets the Latinos in Twentieth Century California Multiple Property Submission registration requirements for Cultural Centers in the historic context Making a Life: Latinos in the Arts.

The following are also National Register of Historic Places nominees. For a description of these properties, please visit www.ohp.parks.ca.gov/pending:

  • Hotel Menlo (Oakland, Alameda County)
  • North Beach Historic District (San Clemente, Orange County)
  • Pioneer Oil Refinery (Santa Clarita, Los Angeles County)
  • Donaldson Futuro (Idyllwild (vicinity), Riverside County)
  • Buon Gusto Sausage Factory (San Francisco, San Francisco County)
  • Benicia City Cemetery (Benicia, Solano County)
  • King Edward Hotel (Los Angeles, Los Angeles County)
  • Oakland Auditorium (Oakland, Alameda County)
  • Santa Cruz Island Archaeological District Amendment (Restricted Location, Santa Barbara County)

California Register of Historical Resources Nomination

Granite Grammar School (Folsom, Sacramento County)

The Spanish Colonial Revival style schoolhouse was constructed in 1915, designed by architects George C. Sellon and Alden W. Campbell, and named for the community's well-known granite quarries. The school integrated contemporary ideas about school design intended to improve light and ventilation while providing a multifunction space.

California Historical Landmark Nomination

Donaldson Futuro (Idyllwild [vicinity], Riverside County)

The first Futuro to arrive in California, the only Futuro in the state until 2015 and the only Futuro in California to have obtained a building permit for residential occupancy, the Donaldson Futuro is the first serially produced plastic house and the first all-structural glass-reinforced polyester house in California. A notable icon in California space-age architecture, the Futuro was relocated to a remote site north of Idyllwild followed by an extensive 2004-2012 interior restoration. In recognition of owner Milford Wayne Donaldson’s restoration effort and resulting preservation of this fragile resource, which was essential to saving the building and raising the profile of the entire family of similar buildings, the property is identified as the Donaldson Futuro.

California Point of Historical Interest Nomination

Cambria Chinese Temple (Cambria, San Luis Obispo County)

The small board-and-batten wooden building, constructed between 1892 and 1895, served as a central temple and community space for the Chinese community of Cambria and San Luis Obispo County. The building was relocated several times on its lot. The building is significant as a rare surviving example of late 19th-century Chinese religious architecture, significant to the Central Coast region where Chinese settlement was sparse compared to California's major cities.

The meeting will not be held at a publicly accessible location, but the public can view the meeting via CAL SPAN or participate in the meeting by registering for attendance via the Zoom link posted on the California State Historical Resources Commission Meeting Schedule and Notices page on the Office of Historic Preservation website (www.ohp.parks.ca.gov/shrcnotice). Nomination information and photos of properties under consideration are available online.

Notices and agendas for Commission meetings are available online 10 days before a meeting at www.ohp.parks.ca.gov. The public may present oral statements at the hearing at the appropriate time. Inquiries and written comments on the agenda may also be emailed to the Office of Historic Preservation at calshpo@ohp.parks.ca.gov or submitted via mail to Julianne Polanco, State Historic Preservation Officer at Office of Historic Preservation, P.O. Box 942896, Sacramento, CA 94296-0001.

General inquiries on the Commission are handled by Twila Willis-Hunter. She may be contacted via phone at (916) 445-7052 or at the same mailing address listed above.

Photo 1: China Shrimp Camp in Contra Costa County. Photo 2: Mission Cultural Center in San Francisco County. Photo 3: Donaldson Futuro in Riverside County. Photo 4: Interior of the Cambria Chinese Temple in San Luis Obispo County.
Photo 1: China Shrimp Camp in Contra Costa County. Photo 2: Mission Cultural Center in San Francisco County. Photo 3: Donaldson Futuro in Riverside County. Photo 4: Interior of the Cambria Chinese Temple in San Luis Obispo County.



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