For Immediate Release: 8/13/2020

California State Historical Resources Commission to Consider 28 Properties for Action

Contact: Newsroom

The California State Historical Resources Commission (Commission) will consider 15 nominations for federal historic designation and 13 nominations for state historic designation on tomorrow, August 14. Due to current pandemic, this meeting will not be held at a publicly accessible location, but the public may view the meeting starting at 9 a.m. via CAL-SPAN or by registering for attendance via Zoom.

Some of the nominations being considered by the Commission under the federal historic designation include the Nisei Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) Post 8985 in Sacramento, which was constructed as the Flower Garden, a restaurant operated by Black entrepreneur Phelix Flowers, and also functioned as a lodge for African American Elks Club members. It was later purchased by Sacramento's Japanese American Citizens League for use as a VFW post established by Japanese American veterans. Also nominated are the Chicano Moratorium marches of 1969 and 1970 in Los Angeles and East Los Angeles, which drew attention to the historic contributions of the Latino community to the United States military in past wars and to the domestic issues affecting the Chicano community.

The California Historical Landmarks nominations include a series of landmarks associated with the Ohlone-Portolá Heritage Trail in San Mateo County, which are all associated with the October-November 1769 expedition of Spanish explorer Gaspar de Portolá through Ohlone territory, and the expedition's interactions with the Ohlone people. This common historic context provides updated documentation and geographical information regarding the expedition, and the Ohlone’s critical role in the success of Portolá’s journey.

All properties being considered at the meeting are the following:

National Register of Historic Places Nominations

Vernon School (Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders in California Multiple Property Submission) - Verona, Sutter County
Established as a gateway to the gold fields, Vernon (later Verona) became a fishing village populated by Native Hawaiians brought to California by John Sutter as laborers. The 1863 building just north of the confluence of the Feather and Sacramento Rivers was constructed in a simplified Folk Victorian style of wood boards nailed to a wood frame, on wood piers with concrete footings. A community resource, the schoolhouse was also used for church services and other meetings. Vernon School is nominated under cover of the Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders in California, 1850–1970 Multiple Property Submission.

Chicano Moratorium March December 20, 1969 (Latinos in Twentieth Century California Multiple Property Submission) - Los Angeles and East Los Angeles, Los Angeles County
The march from Five Points Memorial in the City of Los Angeles to Obregon Park in unincorporated East Los Angeles drew attention to the historic contributions of the Latino community to the United States military in past wars and to the disproportionate sacrifices of the community in the Vietnam War. The success of this march garnered public support and attention for the Chicano movement and subsequent Chicano Moratorium marches.

National Chicano Moratorium March August 29, 1970 (Latinos in Twentieth Century California Multiple Property Submission) - East Los Angeles, Los Angeles County
The march in unincorporated East Los Angeles—from East Third Street in front of the East Los Angeles Civic Center down Atlantic and Whittier Boulevards to a rally in Laguna Park—channeled anti-Vietnam War sentiment to draw attention to domestic issues affecting the Chicano community. The peaceful rally turned into a major conflict between protestors and police officers and sheriff’s deputies. The violent outcome, including the death of prominent journalist Ruben Salazar, convinced many Chicano activists and community members to focus on the unique struggles of the Chicano community and was a milestone for organizing the Chicano community around struggles for equality.

Nisei VFW Post 8985 (Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders in California Multiple Property Submission) - Sacramento, Sacramento County
The one-and-two-story International Style building located in downtown Sacramento was designed by A.E. Kimmel and Roy Swedin. The building was constructed as the Flower Garden, a restaurant operated by Black entrepreneur Phelix Flowers, and also functioned as a lodge for African American Elks Club members. In 1954, the building was purchased by Sacramento's Japanese American Citizens League for use as a VFW post established by Japanese American veterans. The property is nominated under cover of the Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders in California, 1850–1970 Multiple Property Submission.

The following are also National Register of Historic Places nominees. For a description of these properties, please visit ohp.parks.ca.gov/pending

  • Bel Vista House (Palm Springs, Riverside County)
  • Burro Flats Cultural District (Restricted, Ventura County)
  • Desert Golf Course (Palm Springs, Riverside County)
  • Pasadena Field Archery Range (Pasadena, Los Angeles County)
  • St. John’s Chapel, Del Monte (Monterey, Monterey County)
  • John A. Whelan House (San Francisco, San Francisco County)
  • Latinos in Twentieth Century California Multiple Property Submission (Amended) (Multiple Cities, Multiple Counties)
  • Brown Beret Headquarters (Latinos in Twentieth Century California Multiple Property Submission) (Los Angeles, Los Angeles County)
  • Wilshire Vista West Historic District (Los Angeles, Los Angeles County)
  • Hugh Edgar Johnson House (Fullerton, Orange County)
  • Mojave Road (Baker, Cima, Lanfair (vicinity), San Bernardino County)

California Register of Historical Resources Nomination
For a description of the property, please visit ohp.parks.ca.gov/pending

  • Bucks Bar Bridge (Somerset, El Dorado County)

California Historical Landmarks Nominations

Harada House (Riverside, Riverside County)
This two-story residence was built sometime before 1887 and purchased in 1915 by Jukichi Harada, a Japanese immigrant. The house became the subject of a 1918 landmark Superior Court decision granting the Harada family the right to own the property, challenging an anti-immigrant and racist property ownership law that forbade immigrants from Asia from owning property in California. The property is a National Historic Landmark and is significant for its association with Jukichi Harada, who had a profound influence on the history of California.

The following are also California Historical Landmarks nominees. For a description of these properties, please visit ohp.parks.ca.gov/pending

  • Ohlone-Portolá Heritage Trail, Quiroste Village, CHL #23 Amendment (San Mateo County)
  • Ohlone-Portolá Heritage Trail, Purisima Creek, CHL #22 Amendment (San Mateo County)
  • Ohlone-Portolá Heritage Trail, Pilarcitos Creek, CHL #21 Amendment (San Mateo County)
  • Ohlone-Portolá Heritage Trail, Montara Mountain, CHL #25 Amendment (San Mateo County)
  • Ohlone-Portolá Heritage Trail, Laguna Grande, CHL #94 Amendment (San Mateo County)
  • Ohlone-Portolá Heritage Trail, Cañada De Reymundo, CHL #92 Amendment (San Mateo County)
  • Ohlone-Portolá Heritage Trail, Tunitas Beach, CHL #375 Amendment (San Mateo County)
  • Ohlone-Portolá Heritage Trail, Bean Hollow (San Mateo County)
  • Ohlone-Portolá Heritage Trail, Año Nuevo (San Mateo County)
  • New Albion (Marin County)

California Points of Historical Interest Nomination
For a description of the property, please visit ohp.parks.ca.gov/pending.

  • Baumann Manor (Oak Glen, San Bernardino County)

Nomination information and photos of properties under consideration are available online.

Notices and agendas for Commission meetings are available online 10 days before a meeting at ohp.parks.ca.gov. The public may present oral statements at the hearing at the appropriate time. Inquiries and written comments on the agenda may also be emailed to the Office of Historic Preservation at calshpo@ohp.parks.ca.gov or submitted via mail to Julianne Polanco, State Historic Preservation Officer at Office of Historic Preservation, P.O. Box 942896, Sacramento, CA 94296-0001.

General inquiries on the Commission are handled by Twila Willis-Hunter. She may be contacted via phone at (916) 445-7052 or at the same mailing address given above.

 




Subscribe to California State Parks News via e-mail at NewsRoom@parks.ca.gov

California State Parks provides for the health, inspiration and education of the people of California by helping to preserve the state’s extraordinary biological diversity, protecting its most valued natural and cultural resources, and creating opportunities for high quality outdoor recreation.