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CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF PARKS AND RECREATION

Divisions of Boating and Waterways, Historic Preservation and Off-Highway Vehicles


News Release


For Immediate Release: 6/27/2016

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DBW Expands Herbicide Treatment in the Delta for Egeria densa

Contact:

  Gloria Sandoval

916-651-7661

 

SACRAMENTO, Calif. – Continuing the effort to control invasive aquatic plants in the Delta, California State Parks Division of Boating and Waterways (DBW) will begin treating Egeria densa in the Bethel Island region starting July 11 through November 4, 2016. DBW will concurrently be treating curly-leaf pondweed as well.

Recent field surveys of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (Delta) conducted by the division and public feedback show that infestation levels in the Bethel Island region are significant enough for herbicide treatment.

Below is detailed information on the division’s latest control efforts:

 

Submersed Aquatic Vegetation Control Program: Egeria densa and Curly-leaf Pondweed

Herbicide Control

  • Treatment Period: Starting July 11, 2016 through November 4, 2016, treatment period based upon DBW field survey data, water temperatures and fishery surveys.
  • Treatment Areas: In and/or around the following areas (individual areas will be noticed prior to treatment application):
  • Anchorages, Boat Ramps and Marinas: Mariner Cove, New Anchor, Delta Sportsman, Sunset Harbor, Hennis, Carol’s Harbor, and Emerald Pointe Eastern Contra Costa County Area: Taylor Slough and Sandmound Slough
  • Herbicide: Fluridone.

Treated areas will be monitored weekly to ensure herbicide levels do not exceed allowable limits and that herbicide treatments have no adverse impacts on the environment, agriculture or public health in or near the planned treatment areas. All herbicides are registered for aquatic use with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and California Department of Pesticide Regulation.

Since March 8, 2016, DBW has been treating Egeria densa, curly-leaf pondweed, water hyacinth and Spongeplant with herbicides in the Delta (news release). All of these aquatic invasive plants have no known natural controls in the west coast’s largest estuary, the Delta. It is likely that the plants will never be fully eradicated from the region. Therefore, DBW operates “control” programs as opposed to “eradication” programs. The division works with local, state and federal entities to better understand the plants, and implement new integrated strategic methods.

Funding for DBW’s aquatic invasive plant control programs comes from the Harbors and Watercraft Revolving Fund, which receives revenues from boaters’ registration fees and gasoline taxes.

In 1982, California state legislation designated DBW as the lead state agency to cooperate with other state, local and federal agencies in controlling water hyacinth in the Delta, its tributaries, and the Suisun Marsh. The Egeria densacontrol program was authorized by law in 1997 and treatment began in 2001. In 2014, Spongeplant was authorized for control upon completion of the biological assessment and in 2015, curly-leaf pondweed was authorized under amendment to the Egeria densa control program.

The importance of DBW’s control programs is evident in that the aquatic invasive plants negatively impacts Delta’s ecosystem as they displace native plants, block light needed for photosynthesis and reduce the amount of dissolved oxygen in the water. Continued warm temperatures help the plants proliferate at high rates. Plants are also known to form dense mats of vegetation creating safety hazards for boaters, obstructing navigation channels, marinas and irrigation systems.

The public may view the public notices and sign up to receive weekly updates on this year’s treatment season on DBW’s website. For more information, please visit http://dbw.parks.ca.gov/Environmental/Aquatic.aspx.

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Subscribe to California State Parks News via e-mail at info@parks.ca.gov or via RSS feed.

California State Parks Mission

To provide for the health, inspiration and education of the people of California by helping to preserve the state’s extraordinary biological diversity, protecting its most valued natural and cultural resources, and creating opportunities for high quality outdoor recreation.