Round 6 State of California ORLP Process

Round 6 State of California ORLP Process

This page contains an overview of what applicants will complete in the online Submittable application platform.

There are 5 application requirements in the online application system:

Eligibility Screening

1. Section 106 and NEPA

To meet the new ORLP Round 6 requirement, applicants must have already completed Section 106 and NEPA for the Round 6 project site/scope of work. 

  • For Section 106, applicants will upload the State Historic Preservation Officer (SHPO) concurrence letter that includes this specific project's scope.
  • For Environmental Documents, applicants will upload the following:
  • CEQA: Notice of Exemption (NOE) or Notice of Determination (NOD), and either:
  • Completed NEPA environmental assessment (EA) or Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).
    or
  • NEPA pathway section Application and Revision (A&R) Form with NPS CAT EX code. The A&R Form can be obtained by emailing Megan.Harrison@parks.ca.gov or Natalie.Bee@parks.ca.gov

 

2. Project Site Location in City/Town with at least 30,000 People

This federal program is for projects in cities or towns with at least 30,000 people. To enable California’s ORLP Review Team to assess if the project is in a City/Town with a population of at least 30,000 residents, applicants will provide the Project Site Address. If the site does not have a street address, create a hyperlink to the Google Map location of the project site.

The project is in a city or town of at least 30,000 people = Eligible

The project is in a city or town having less than 30,000 people = Ineligible

 

 3Committed Funds

This federal program is a reimbursement only program and requires the applicant to cash-flow 100% of the total project costs, with the understanding that ORLP can reimburse up to 50% of the total project cost. For example, for a $20 million project where the applicant is seeking $10 million in ORLP grant funding, the applicant must certify they have the cash on hand and committed funds to complete the $20 million project. See below for more information.

All non-federal (state, local, or private) sources are eligible for match.

The only federal sources that are eligible as match for this program are Community Development Block Grants (CDBG), Fixing America's Surface Transportation (FAST) Act funding, and Readiness and Environmental Protection Integration Program (REPI) funding.

For purpose of this proposal, “committed” means the money is already secured. 

The applicant will list each funding source and provide the dollar amount of that source.

  • Reimbursable Cashflow Source: This amount needs to equal the ORLP grant request amount for up to 50% of the total project cost. This is the funding that will be used to cashflow the ORLP grant amount, until an ORLP reimbursement is processed. For example, general funds of the agency may be identified to “cash-flow” the ORLP grant amount until a reimbursement is paid.
  • Match Source: Funding source(s) proposed for match must be committed and must total at least 50% of the total project cost. Applicants may only list committed funds. For purpose of this proposal, “committed” means the money is already secured. The total amount of "committed" funds for match must equal at least 50% of the total project cost.

Eligible = The applicant listed and certified state, local, private, or eligible federal funding match sources that equal the total project cost, with the understanding that ORLP can reimburse up to 50% of the total project cost.

Ineligible = Committed funds are not available or more fundraising will be needed.

 

4. Timeline Confirmation

The applicant will certify an understanding of the state and nation competitive review timeline for this federal grant program. This program requires states to receive and review applications before the applications may be forwarded to National Park Service to enter a national competition.

 

5. Confirmation of Land Ownership for Public Outdoor Recreation in Perpetuity

The applicant will certify it owns or will own the project property and agrees it will remain as a park for the public’s benefit in perpetuity. This federal program is subject to 54 U.S.C. 200.305.f.3. of the Land and Water Conservation Fund Act, which provides a source of protection to set aside land for public recreational benefits.

The entire park will be placed under federal protection for outdoor recreational use in perpetuity should the grant be awarded by NPS. This means the site, if funded, shall be owned by the grantee, and remain for outdoor recreation use in perpetuity.

 

Project Selection Criteria

Project Summary (500-word limit – not scored)

Applicants will provide a brief summary of the proposed project deliverables.

 

Criteria 1: Poverty Level and Park Space

1.A Percentage of Persons Below the Poverty Line

To determine if the project area has a high population affected by poverty, applicants will provide the census tract number and percentage of persons below the poverty line of the economically-disadvantaged community targeted by the project (using http://censusreporter.org/locate). Applicants must select a census tract within a half-mile radius.

In order to be eligible for NPS's consideration, the targeted community's census tract must have a poverty rate of 20% or higher.

Points for 1.A - Poverty Level within the project area:

Census Tract Poverty Level of 20% or Higher = 20 points

Census Tract Poverty Levels under 20% are not eligible.

 

If there are multiple census tracts within the half-mile of the project, the applicant may choose the census tract with the highest percentage of people below the poverty line. However, the population of the census tract selected must be able to walk to the project site without physical barriers that hinder access. Examples are freeways or rivers without a pedestrian bridge or pedestrian underpass.

 

1.B - Existing Park Space within a Half-Mile Radius

To determine if the project area has a low ratio of park acreage per 1,000 residents within a half-mile radius, applicants will provide a Community FactFinder Report generated at the project site. Using this tool, the pin must be located on or in the park boundary. If the pin used to create the Community FactFinder Report was not located on or in the park boundary, the ORLP Review Team reserves the right to create a new report in the middle of the project site.

 

To provide the report, click “Get Report.” A PDF Report will be generated.

 

Urban economically disadvantaged communities with low park acreage are prioritized in this federal program. The number of park acreage per 1,000 residents within the project area, according to the Community Factfinder Report, will be ranked on a statewide scale as follows:

 

Points for 1.B - Park acreage per 1,000 residents within the project area:

Lowest 20% of statewide applications = 20 points

21%-30% of statewide applications = 18 points

31%-40% of statewide applications = 16 points

41%-50% of statewide applications = 14 points

51-60% of statewide applications = 12 points

61%-70% of statewide applications = 10 points

71%-80% of statewide applications = 8 points

Highest 81-100% of statewide applications = 6 points

 

Criteria 2: Type of Project

2.A - Type of Project

Criteria 2 evaluates how a project creates new impactful outdoor recreation features. The national priority for this program is to create new parks, or, to create new outdoor recreation features that are not available in an existing park.

“New Park” means the project site has not been a public park in the past, and if the grant is awarded, the project will acquire land for or develop a new public park where one currently does not exist.

“Expand Existing Park” means the project includes adding acreage to increase the official boundaries of an existing park.  The project may also include improvements within the existing park boundary.

“Improve Park / No Expansion” means the project will take place within the existing park boundary, and does not involve adding acreage to increase the size of the park boundary.

 

Points for Type of Project:

New Park = 10 points

Expand Existing Park = 7 points

Improve Existing Park/No Expansion = 5 points

The project will not create, expand, or improve a park = Ineligible

 

 

2.B - New Outdoor Recreation Features

While renovations of existing features can be part of the project, the purpose of this section is to check what new outdoor recreation features are proposed, as this will make the project more competitive to the National Review Committee. The new recreation feature(s) must be outdoors. Projects that create multiple new recreation features to significantly increase the number of people or user groups that may be served will be most competitive.

 

Points for New Recreation Features:

Four or More New Outdoor Recreation Features are proposed = 20 points

Three New Outdoor Recreation Features are proposed = 15 points

Two New Outdoor Recreation Features are proposed = 10 points

One New Outdoor Recreation Features is proposed = 5 points

The project only involves renovation of existing features = 0 points

 

2.C - Green Space

The purpose of this section is to determine how the project will increase access to nature by creating new green spaces, shady areas (via tree cover), and natural landscapes that help cool the air and reduce urban heat island effects, reduce pollution, and have positive effects on mental and physical health. Applicants will describe how the project create new green spaces, natural landscapes, and tree cover.

 

Points for Green Space:

The project creates substantial new green spaces, natural landscapes, and tree cover compared to other statewide applications = 15 points

The project creates moderate new green spaces, natural landscapes, and tree cover compared to other statewide applications = 10 points

The project creates minimal new green spaces, natural landscapes, and tree cover compared to other statewide applications = 5 points

The project does not create new green spaces, natural landscapes, and tree cover compared to other statewide applications = 0 points

 

Criteria 3: SCORP Priorities

3 - SCORP Priorities

Applicants will describe how the project meets the SCORP Priorities. To be eligible, the project must meet at least one of these priorities. Projects that meet multiple priorities will be more competitive. Consider this guidance:

  1. New Park Access – The response should describe how the project will qualify as a “new park” or “expanding an existing park.”
  2. Preservation – The response should describe whether part or all of the project site has not previously been funded by the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF).
  3. Multi-Use Parks for All Ages – The response should describe how the project will be designed to address one or more of the following: 
    1. Designed to bring families together by supporting art and music, sports, and multi-generational activities. 
    2. Supports different active and passive recreation interests of all ages. 
    3. Incorporate project design ideas from all age groups.
  4. Health Design Goals – The response should describe how this project results from asking community members for their park design ideas for public health.
  5. Safety and Beautification – The response should describe the how this project includes enhancements for:
    1. Safe public use such as lighting, netting, strategic location of features, etc.
    2. Beautification, such as landscaping to make the park more welcoming. Note that National Park Service will not fund public art enhancements.

 

 

Points for Meeting 2021-2025 SCORP Priorities:

All Five SCORP Priorities will be met between the project elements = 15 points

Four SCORP Priorities will be met between the project elements = 12 points

Three SCORP Priorities will be met between the project elements = 9 points

Two SCORP Priorities will be met between the project elements = 6 points

One SCORP Priority will be met between the project elements = 3 points

No SCORP Priority will be met = 0 points and will not be recommended for funding

 

Agency Certification and Contact Person

State Parks Office of Grants and Local Services Competitive Review Process will use the above information to rank all statewide ORLP proposals and select the most competitive proposals for ORLP Round 6. An application contact will certify authorization to submit the proposal on behalf of the grant applicant.

Final Reminders:

All applications must be entered through the online Submittable application platform.

   submit

Responses must be complete and submitted by September 1, 2022 (Round 6A) or December 15, 2022 (Round 6B). Additional documents will not be accepted after the deadline unless requested by OGALS.

Applicants can email questions to Megan Harrison at Megan.Harrison@parks.ca.gov or Natalie Bee at Natalie.Bee@parks.ca.gov.

Thank you for your interest in the ORLP California Process!