Pillar Point SMCA, Montara SMR and Egg (Devil's Slide) Rock to Devil's Slide Special Closure

Like state and national parks protect wildlife and habitats on land, marine protected areas (MPAs) conserve and restore wildlife and habitats in our ocean. Under the California Marine Life Protection Act (MLPA) passed in 1999, California began a historic effort to establish a science-based, statewide network of MPAs through a collaborative effort that includes the California Department of Fish and Wildlife and California State Parks. California is taking a regional approach to the design and implementation of MPAs, and has divided the state into five regions: the north coast, south coast, north central coast, central coast and San Francisco Bay.

MPAs contribute to healthier, more resilient ocean ecosystems that can better withstand a wide range of impacts such as pollution and climate change. By protecting entire ecosystems rather than focusing on a single species, MPAs are powerful tools for conserving and restoring ocean biodiversity, and protecting cultural resources, while allowing certain activities such as marine recreation and research. There is a global body of scientific evidence about the effectiveness of marine protected areas and reserves to restore marine ecosystems (http://www.piscoweb.org/outreach/pubs/reserves).

In the waters adjacent to Montara State Beach there are two MPAs and one Special Closure, Pillar Point State Marine Conservation Area (SMCA), Montara State Marine Reserve (SMR) and Egg (Devil's Slide) Rock to Devil's Slide Special Closure

  • Pillar Point State Marine Conservation Area (SMCA)
    • This area is bounded by the mean high tide line and straight lines connecting the following points in the order listed except where noted:
      37° 30.00' N. lat. 122° 29.93' W. long.;
      37° 30.00' N. lat. 122° 34.61' W. long.;
      thence southward along the three nautical mile offshore boundary to
      37° 28.33' N. lat. 122° 33.47' W. long.;
      37° 28.33' N lat. 122° 30.83' W. long.;
      37° 29.18' N lat. 122° 30.36' W. long.; and
      37° 29.74' N lat. 122° 29.97' W, long.
    • An extraordinary diversity of birds benefit from the abundance of food and protected habitat here including terns, egrets, great blue herons, cormorants, black oystercatchers and gulls.
    • This stretch of coast provides numerous haul-out sites for harbor seals and sea lions, and both MPAs are breeding areas for harbor seals.
    • Permitted/Prohibited Uses: Take of all living marine resources is prohibited except:
      1. Recreational take of pelagic finfish by trolling, Dungeness crab by trap and market squid by hand-held dip net are allowed.
      2. Commercial take of pelagic finfish with troll fishing gear or seine, Dungeness crab by trap and market squid by round haul net are allowed.
    • Pillar Point Brochure - includes additional information on the natural history, key species, and regulations of this MPA, as well as a detailed map with GPS coordinates of the area.

  • Montara State Marine Reserve (SMR)
    • This area is bounded by the mean high tide line and straight lines connecting the following points in the order listed except where noted:
      37° 32.70' N. lat. 122° 31.00' W. long.;
      37° 32.70' N. lat. 122° 34.91' W. long.;
      thence southward along the three nautical mile offshore boundary to
      37° 30.00' N. lat. 122° 34.61' W. long.; and
      37° 30.00' N. lat. 122° 29.93' W. long.
    • Organisms seen at low tide may include chitons, snails, anemones, sea stars, crabs, nudibranchs, abalone, sea urchins, shrimp, sculpin and limpets.
    • Twenty-five species of marine plants and animals, new to science were discovered at Moss Beach in the Montara SMR.
    • Permitted/Prohibited Uses: Take of all living marine resources is prohibited.
    • Montara Brochure - includes additional information on the natural history, key species, and regulations of this MPA, as well as a detailed map with GPS coordinates of the area.

  • Egg (Devil's Slide) Rock to Devil's Slide Special Closure
    • Boundaries:
      From the mean high tide line to a distance of 300 feet seaward of the mean lower low tide line of any shoreline of any of the three rocks comprising Egg (Devil's Slide) Rock, located in the vicinity of
      37° 34.64' N. lat. 122° 31.29' W. long;
      37° 34.66' N. lat. 122° 31.32' W. long; and
      37° 34.63' N. lat. 122° 31.29' W. long;
      and the area bounded by the mean high tide line and straight lines connecting the following points in the order listed:
      37° 34.74' N. lat. 122° 31.08' W. long;
      37° 34.72' N. lat. 122° 31.31' W. long;
      37° 34.60' N. lat. 122° 31.33' W. long; and
      37° 34.52' N. lat. 122° 31.21' W. long
    • In 1986 an oil spill wiped out this entire breeding colony of 3,000 Common Murres. A decade later the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service began a large and successful restoration project. Using decoys, mirrors and Common Murre recordings, biologists were able to bring birds back to the rock. Today, Devil’s Slide Rock and the nearby mainland are home to breeding colonies of Common Murres, Brandt’s and Pelagic Cormorants, Pigeon Guillemots and Western Gulls. All human activity is prohibited within 300 feet of Devil’s Slide Rock, year-round. No transit between the rock and the mainland.
    • Permitted/Prohibited Uses: Take of all living marine resources is prohibited.
    • Other Regulations:
      1. Transit in between the rock and the mainland between these points is prohibited at any time.
      2. No person shall enter the area, except for agencies identified in Title 14 Section 632 CCR, when performing their official duties.
    • A Boater and Kayaker Guide to Special Closures in California’s Marine Protected Areas – includes detailed information on each of the Special Closures along the north central coast.

This information does not replace the official regulatory language found in California Code of Regulations, Title 14, Section 632, including commercial allowances and restrictions.

  • A fishing license is required for any fishing.
  • All existing take regulations still apply in addition to the ones listed above.
  • Unless otherwise stated, all non-consumptive recreational activities are allowed.

Additional Resources:

For additional information on MPAs please visit the California Department of Fish and Wildlife’s website: http://www.dfg.ca.gov/mlpa/

For resources related to MPAs, please visit the Marine Protected Areas Education and Outreach Initiative’s website: http://www.californiampas.org/