Tips to Prepare for PAT

Preparing for Physical Agility Test and Academy's Physical Conditioning Program


Applicants who are engaged in a vigorous lifetime fitness program generally do not have any problems with the State Park Peace Officer Cadet Selection Process’ “Physical Agility Test” and the POST-required academy physical conditioning program. It is almost impossible, though, for sedentary individuals to complete the program without problems. For best results, your exercise program should already match the descriptions below.

 

           Aerobic conditioning, 3-5 days per week, 20-60 minutes each day, continuous jogging on most days each week.

 

           Muscular strength/endurance, 2-3 days per week, one set of 8-10 exercises including upper body, core, and legs, 8-20 repetitions per set.

 

           Grip / Wrist / Forearm Strength exercises – In preparation for the 220 yard hand-weight carrying test of the PAT, practice lifting and carrying 45 lbs dumbbells along with regular one arm curls with a barbell exercises.  Additional exercises with hand grips and stress balls will help to build and condition your hand, wrist, and forearm strength.  This type of strength is critical for effective handgun and other weapon use, as well as tactical and rescue requirements of the job. 

 

           Flexibility, static stretching, at least 2-3 days per week, preferably 5-7 days, 8-12 stretches each day, hold each stretch for 15-30 seconds and repeat each 2-4 times.

 

           Continuous participation at the above-described levels that last six months without injury.

 

If your exercise program does not meet these specifications, then you should consider taking a body conditioning, weight training, or jogging class as needed.

 

 

The Academy POST-required Conditioning Program

 

The academy's conditioning program consists of aerobic, strength, muscular endurance, and flexibility conditioning. Usually, jogging is the mode of aerobic conditioning. Calisthenics circuit training or weight circuit training is most commonly used for strength and muscular endurance conditioning. Static stretching is the usual mode of flexibility conditioning.